Wednesday, August 9, 2017

A Mother's Innate Wisdom to Nurture as Nature Intended is at Risk....

Martha's Vineyard. Lambert's Cove on left, walking east from beyond James Pond.  

My work as a Health Coach here on the island, allows me to massage the stress (tension, emotions, stored trauma) therapeutically from the necks, back & shoulders (scalenes, occiput, jaws!!), chest (pectoralis, diaphragm) and hips (psoas) of my clients; my work teaching yoga to the open and willing practitioner encourages introspection and awareness, the recognition and release of tension and the expression of joy and inner happiness. Listening to and observing my clients cues me in to their inner nature and to how their lives may be going against their best nature and functioning.   

Follow nature, and she will be your instructor. The ways of nature are simple, and she does not require any complicated prescriptions. The invisible forces within the body are a powerful force which may be guided by the imagination and propelled by the will.
 ... Paracelsus (1493-1541)
One of the greatest physicians of all time.

Thursday, May 4, 2017

EATING to EASE STRESS & DIS-EASE (in a complicated world)

NATURE WARNS US from within via inflammation and dis-ease responses
NATURE ALSO GIVES US WHAT WE NEED to feed, fuel and optimize our bodies and minds

LEARN MORE in classes I'll be teaching at NOT YOUR SUGAR MAMAS notyoursugarmamas.com
in beautiful Martha's Vineyard.

TUESDAY: May 9th & TUESDAY May 16th
5:30-7:30 PM
$40/night (sign up for both nights $75)
A healthy vegan, low-glycemic, gluten-free meal included

SIGN UP at ky@notyoursugarmamas.com 


Life isn't easy, yet we know this journey is a great opportunity to explore and grow with experience. Life can be easier if we complicate it less by living a life more in tune with nature, and the natural vibration of LOVE. 
By listening to nature (your own inner wisdom) you can learn what foods fuel you best. 
We'll discuss gut health and the emotions that align with certain gut types, and we'll eat and discover the anti-inflammatory effects of certain natural foods and how your body functions on them to bring ease back into your body, mind and spirit. 

You'll learn what stresses you, and what eases you.  

STRESS - in the form of hard to digest foods, self-sabotaging thoughts and mis-takes in your diet, environment and lifestyle

STRESS causes emotional and bodily signs of WARNING, an inflamed belly, brain and body in the form of a yeasty bloat, a pinching headache, a constipated colon, a restless sleep, anxiety, depression, irrational behavior, reactivity instead of response- ability. 

INFLAMMATION of gut and brain is an ALERT 
-- SOMETHING IS NOT RIGHT, REBOOT or CRASH ---
antibodies shoot at antigens, or what the gut bacteria and immune cells along your gut lining thinks is an antigen (a foreign, unnatural, undigestable substance/energy that confuses, clogs or disrupts the natural flow, function or form-ation of your physical and mental presence)

Life as we instinctually know it- can be easier though then we may think. It's just complicated now because of the world around us. 

We may think we need to meditate more... take more yoga classes... read yet another self-help blog or watch yet another Eye-opening inspirational film or TedX talk to help get us outside the box of our stimulating lives, and yes we may need just that to open up into the world of spacious awareness that is always inside if we just retreat inward.  

I tell my health clients, health is easier to attain than you think, you just have to attune to nature. Listen to the natural world, within and throughout. The gurgle of your stomach with the whiff of basil and garlic or cinnamon and vanilla tells you your body is ready to eat and be nourished, refueled so to grow or repair; the scent of a rose brings you back to your mother's nurturing arms and reminds you to call her or give someone a hug which you know will make you feel loved and loving... the action side of that great word, LOVE. We get messages all day to rest, drink water, take a walk, but do we follow the birds song out into the sun, or do we pour ourselves a glass of water or take a nap? 

Those are your direct messages, your road map full of sensual, intuitive rememberances for you to follow on this journey, called life. 

 have so many confusing messages which draw us into a world that isn't so instinctual, it's interesting, it's maybe easier, but it confuses our senses and our body's innate wisdom to nurture and grow, procreate and sustain ever lasting spiritual bliss. 

And contrary to what people say, there is a blueprint to follow, a path... it's within each and every one of us, it's our innate wisdom, our soul's desires, our natural instinctual connection with the direction of life towards happiness and bliss, dream fulfillment and health as nature and the supreme intelligence, aka GOD, or the ONE has held space for us to manifest. 

To "seize the day”—means “act now,” “there’s no time like the present.”
It has to do not with ceasing, but with acting. 
Act on your intuition, the signs from your body (the natural world within you- including your very communicative micro-biota) and Act on the responses from the world around you. Here lies the Direction the creative force of nature and supreme intelligence gives you. Take these signs (a cold sore, baggy eyes, bloating and fatigue... as a course of direction and shift your lifestyle for new instructions on how to read your DNA coding more healthfully.

As much as we tell ourselves 'we need to eat better, exercise and get out from behind our screens and into the natural world more', we often get side stepped from the path of our innate wisdom. Learn what foods get you back on track, learn what practices keep you on the track and learn how to listen to your own unique physical and spiritual guides by attuning to the natural world within and throughout. Get off the processed lab food, get out into the sunlight, get your hands dirty with soil, take a long bath and a deep sleep in complete darkness... and listen to what your body tells you now... LIVE out your  dreams, NOW.

http://kellybroganmd.com/steps-healthy-microbiome/

Sunday, March 12, 2017

PLANT YOUR SPRING CLEANSE PLANS NOW!!

www.hOMnaturale.com

hOMnaturale: Yoga & Natural Family Health & Wellness
Rebecca J. Briggs, RYT, CN

Health Coach & Yoga Teacher w/ 25+ years of experience // Private & Public Sessions held on Martha’s Vineyard & in Southern RI


SPRING DETOX WORKSHOPS:

SAT. 3/11 3-5 PM @MansionHouseMV  Thanks for coming everyone – schedule a cleanse!

SAT. 4/8 3-5 PM @Not Your Sugar Mama’s Vineyard Haven, MV  FREE  Directions


SPRING CLEANSING on THE VINEYARD: 


Choose your dates, March 19-April 22, for a “2-7 Day Detox hOMe & Body Cleanse” w/ support, yoga, meditation & essential oil massage from Rebecca + Not Your Sugar Mama’s clean food for daily pick up


OBX SPRING CLEANSE YOGA & RAW FOOD RETREAT 4/24 – 4/30

 Outer Banks, NC w/Drew McCall Burke on raw food & Rebecca on yoga, massage & nutrition http://motherswholefoodkitchen.com/retreats/  

Call Rebecca: 401-533-0116


Practice Yoga w/ Rebecca:

Thursdays  8:15-9:30 am @MansionHouseMV Rebecca’s regular all level yoga class


Friday Free Community Yoga 5:30-7 pm @YogaBarnMV 3/17 http://marthas-vineyard-yoga-barn.com/


Tuesday  8:15 am @MansionHouseMV for Bonnie on 3/21, 3/28 & 4/04


Wednesday  9-10:30 am Vinyasa yoga for Bonnie @YogaBarnMV on 3/22 & 3/29 + Friday 3/31 + Monday 4/03


Sundays (8 wk Spring Series: 3/26-5/28) 12-1 pm @AirportFitnessMV


Saturdays (May-Sept) 8:30-9:15 am  @SeaSpaSalonMV @VineyardSquareHotel


Check the all-island yoga schedule out @mvyoga.com for sub dates & wkshps


Tuesday Tea & Meditation in May 9-10 am @Nonchalantmom in Wakefield, RI  & TBA

SEASONAL CLEANSES & LIFESTYLE SUPPORT:

A) 2-4 Day ‘Detox hOMe & Body’ – Nutrient Dense Cleanse & Yoga Immersion Includes: 1:1 health coaching & 75 min. Thai massage session w/ Rebecca, 1-2 group yoga & meditation classes (private $60); food pick-ups at “Not Your Sugar Mama’s” including organic veggie drinks, salads, soups & broths (if not on MV, food pickups can be prearranged elsewhere or created at hOMe) + super food snacks & other hOMe & body cleansing goodies, including a hOMe journal. Attend demos on hOMe juicing, sauerkraut & bone broth. Receive bio-individualized meal plans, food lists & recipes + yoga asanas, mudras, mantras & meditations for your hOMe practice. $299-$499 Pkgs,+10% off services @SeaSpaSalonMV and accommodations available @VineyardSqHotel, @MansionHouseMV on the Vineyard.
B) 21- 90 Day ‘Grow a Healthy Gut ’ — “All disease begins in the gut.” ~ Hippocrates  Gradually heal, seal & replenish your gut; lessen inflammation belly to brain & manage your weight, blood sugar & mood naturally. Optimize your mental, emotional and physical wellbeing. Includes weekly lifestyle health coaching & monitoring of your bio-individualized gut-health meal plans, recipes &  shopping lists. Plus 2 yoga & meditation classes/week in a scheduled class or private session. Safely eliminate what harms & add the rituals & foods that heal with the inspiration & support you need. Weekly coaching & live/online sessions begin at $30-$100/week (20 minutes to 90 minutes calls/sessions).  Add or sub-in, pantry/fridge restocks, shopping & cooking sessions, or extra stress management movement & mediation sessions (outdoor fitness to massage).
C) 1-3 DAY REBOOTS: 2 organic, green juices & 1 colorful, anti-inflammatory soup/day with Q & A support, $50.

Health Coaching Sessions: Book in RI or MV $45/30 min., $75/60 min., $120/90 min FIRST SESSION FREE: “Health History & Intent” 50 min. phone, live or Skype.

Ongoing subscription health coaching: $30-$100/week, w/Massage $125/hr-$175/90 (or) 3 for $330 

THIS SPRING GIFT YOURSELF
W/ A YOGA & RAW FOOD WELLNESS RETREAT



Outer Banks North Carolina Spring Raw Food Retreat

Are you ready to cleanse and learn the art of eating a clean diet? 
We are so excited to present our Rejuvenating Raw Food Retreat, 
complete with luscious meals of fresh fruit and whole food meals, 
juices and fresh coconut water to replenish your appetite. 
We offer Live food demos to teach you the wonderful ease of putting 
together fantastic meals. 
All of your Juices, Smoothies and Meals are freshly made for you. 
You will experience fantastic taste 
sensations while cleansing your body…

Learn more and get daily info and inspiration on the OBX Raw Food Spring Retreat Facebook page.
Click Here

For more info and to register, please visit OBX Raw Food Spring Retreat webpage.
Click Here











Click to learn more

Sunday, February 12, 2017

DRY TO DAMP - STAYING BALANCED with FOOD as MEDICINE on COLD WINTER WEEKENDS

Dosha-Balancing Recipes
By Chef Marc Rouse
Butternut Squash Soup
Vata
Preparation Time: 10 minutes; Cooking Time: 55 minutes
  • 2 Butternut squash cut in half seed removed
  • 1 cup yellow onion, peeled and chopped
  • 1/2 cup chopped garlic
  • 32 ounces vegetable stock
  • 1 ounce goat cheese
  • 3 ounces olive oil
  • 1 ounce Sun Dried Tomatoes, softened and minced
  • 2 ounce white wine
  • 1 lemon
  • Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste
Turn the over to 375 degrees. Score butternut squash, brush with olive oil and add salt and pepper. Cook the butternut squash in oven until fork tender about 25 minutes. Remove squash from the oven, let cool and remove flesh from skin. In a 3 quart stockpot add remaining olive oil. Let the oil get hot and then add the onion. Cook and stir for two min and add the garlic. Cook another two minutes and deglaze with white wine. Next add the stock and the butternut squash. Bring to a boil and lower heat to simmer. Cook for 15 minutes, remove from flame, and puree the soup with a hand blender. Put the soup back on the flame and cook for another 15 minutes. Add salt, pepper and fresh squeezed lemon to taste. Garnish with goat cheese and sun dried tomatoes.
Servings: 4
Baja Shrimp with Vegetable Basmati Rice and Tofu Cilantro Mint Sauce
Pitta
Preparation Time: 20 minutes; Cooking Time: 25 minutes
  • 4 grilled Baja shrimp size U 12-15
  • 1 cup cooked basmati rice
  • 1/4 cup broccoli florets, cut into small pieces steamed
  • 1/4 cup cauliflower florets cut into small pieces steamed
  • 1/4 cup carrots, peeled and diced steamed
  • 2 tablespoons sauteed onion
  • 1 cup silken tofu
  • 1/4 cup cilantro
  • 4 mint leaves
  • 1/4 teaspoon fresh ground cumin
  • Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste
  • Lemon juice, freshly squeezed to taste
For sauce: In a food processor add tofu, cilantro, cumin, onion and mint. Blend until smooth scrape sides and add salt pepper and lemon to taste. Blend for 10 more seconds. Place sauce on stove and gently heat. To plate lay sauce down first, then add rice. Next top with vegetables and last place the shrimp. Enjoy with fresh herbs on top.
Servings: 2
Kale Salad
Kapha
  • 1 bunch kale
  • 1 carrots, julienne
  • 1 rib celery julienne
  • 1/2 Gala apple sliced
  • 2 ounces blue cheese
  • 3 ounces FOOD! by Marc Herb Vinaigrette
Wash and dry all vegetables. Lightly rub olive oil salt and pepper on kale then grill on low both sides. Be careful no to burn the kale. Next steam the kale for three minutes and immediately shock in cold water. Next cut celery and carrot in julienne strips. Slice apple and prepare blue cheese. To assemble the salad put kale in mixing bowl and toss with vinaigrette. Place kale on the plate and top with carrots, celery, blue cheese and apples.

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

WORLDLY WORDS OF WELLNESS & WAYS that WE HAVEN'T COINED IN US


Waldeinsamkeit

Friluftsliv

Arbejdsglæde





6 Foreign Health Concepts from Around the Globe


Maybe it was running across the word Kummerspeck (literally translated from German as “grief bacon,” meaning weight put on through emotional eating). A strange term if there ever was one… The fact is, I’ve always been fascinated by how languages can reflect particular feelings or phenomena most of us would never think to put a word to. When it comes to the language of health [1] and well-being, I think certain terms have the unique power to literally shift our perception. They make us think differently about the choices in front of us [2] and the ways we interact with the the world. What health concepts can we learn from other cultures? How might they change our understanding of the choices we make every day – or how we view our options for living in general? Perhaps you have your own foreign terms that come to mind. I think these six concepts offer some intriguing food for thought.

Waldeinsamkeit

This German word (a mouthful, right?) means woodland solitude. As a combination of Wald (forest) and Einsamkeit (solitude or loneliness), the term evokes the quiet and seclusion [3] we can feel in the wilderness. With so many of us living in crowded cities [4] or suburbs these days, the feeling of Waldeinsamkeit can almost be a nostalgic experience.
When was the last time you were alone in the forest – secluded with nothing but the sound of the wind through the trees and bird calls from various corners of the wood? It’s a rarer instance these days, and I think that fact suggests there’s something endangered about this aspect of the human spirit [5]. The statement might sound draconian, but perhaps Waldeinsamkeit as a concept underscores a certain core experience to primal humanity, an experience that fewer of us have these days and most of us have less often. Who’s up for changing this?

Shinrin-yoku

While we’re on the subject of forests, here’s a tangible reason to get lost in the woods this weekend. Translated as “forest bathing,” shinrin-yoku is a growing trend and research-backed medical practice in Japan. The Japanese government has even partnered with the medical community to offer free check-ups in park areas and to designate official “forest therapy” sites.
Research on the effects of shinrin-yoku has demonstrated the power of a 3-day trip [6] to the forest to decrease blood pressure, pulse rate, and cortisol levels. But the real kicker is the impact on the body’s NK (natural killer) cells, lymphocytes that fight off infection and cancer growth as well as anti-cancer protein expression. The benefits, studies show, can last up to a month!
As the Primal logic suggests, activities that mirror the best of our evolutionary upbringing [7] will prompt the best hormonal and cellular responses, which then support the best mental and physical outcomes. When you have the chance to get to the wilderness [8], for the love of Grok [9] go! If you don’t have the chance, create the opportunity for yourself as soon as you can.

Friluftsliv

Try saying that five times as fast as you can…. Translated literally as “free air life,” it encompasses the emotional and spiritual well-being [10] to be had by being/living outside. However we choose to spend our time outside (e.g nature photography, hiking, trail running [11], Tai Chi in the park, picnicking, bike riding, Ultimate Frisbee or even napping), there’s something to the outdoor experience that’s unique and works on our mental mood.
As I’ve mentioned here before, time outdoors [12] works on our emotional, hormonal and overall physiological responses as well. Exercising outdoors, for one, has been shown to offer better stress relief than working out indoors.

Koyaanisqatsi

A Native American term from the Hopi culture, koyaanisqatsi means “crazy life” or even life out of balance. The larger sense behind the word suggests a way of life that is falling apart, a state of affairs that calls for another way of being.
We might be tempted to see the concept in our personal lives, and I can certainly see the applicability there. When we find ourselves overrun with insane commutes and overwhelming commitments, we eventually hit a point of critical mass. When we live in tune with our physical bodies, we realize we’re being called to find a new way of life, a better life balance [13].
Truer to the original intent, koyaanisqatsi refers to larger cultural conditions that can make life unsustainable – at both a sociological and ecological level. It’s not hard to see the applicability of this term to much of modern times. For all the benefits, much of modern life confounds our primal psychologies [14], not to mention the natural order of ecological balance. I think Primal can have something to do with that new way of living [15] in response….

Uitwaaien

After getting into the walking series [16] a couple of months ago, I was taken in by this Dutch term, which means to take a break to walk outside and clear one’s head [17].
Clearly, this concept hits on the need for outdoor time, but it also suggests something essential to the primal picture. Modern life drains us with such emphasis on directed attention. The result? We get emotionally irritable and mentally fatigued. The opposite of this is involuntary attention, the kind of unfocused but attentive presence [18] that would characterize Grok’s scanning of the horizon. Yet, this kind of attention plays such a small role in our day. We, being creatures of free will, have a choice.
Instead of hopping online at night or doing a crossword, we can give ourselves time to not think (an earth-shattering concept, no?). How about watching the dog play like a fool in the yard or going for a walk where we don’t have to watch for traffic? Daydreaming [19], anyone? Even mindless chores or creative hobbies that get us into a flow can offer enough cognitive variety to ease our weary modern brains.

Arbejdsglæde

This Danish word translates as “work happiness” or the satisfaction we feel with fulfilling work [20]. How many of us have felt this? When was the last time we did? Although we may situate our vocational vision outside of the work that pays the bills, do we experience this kind of joy [21] in our professional, volunteer or hobby endeavors?
In a culture that can perseverate on money, prestige [22], and comparison, Arbejdsglæde is one more reminder that vocational fulfillment is a means of genuine happiness – and inclusive well-being.
Thanks for reading, everyone. Which of the above grab your interest, and how do they speak to you? Do you have health concepts from around the globe to add to the list? Enjoy the end of your week.

6 Foreign Health Concepts from Around the Globe


Maybe it was running across the word Kummerspeck (literally translated from German as “grief bacon,” meaning weight put on through emotional eating). A strange term if there ever was one… The fact is, I’ve always been fascinated by how languages can reflect particular feelings or phenomena most of us would never think to put a word to. When it comes to the language of health [1] and well-being, I think certain terms have the unique power to literally shift our perception. They make us think differently about the choices in front of us [2] and the ways we interact with the the world. What health concepts can we learn from other cultures? How might they change our understanding of the choices we make every day – or how we view our options for living in general? Perhaps you have your own foreign terms that come to mind. I think these six concepts offer some intriguing food for thought.

Waldeinsamkeit

This German word (a mouthful, right?) means woodland solitude. As a combination of Wald (forest) and Einsamkeit (solitude or loneliness), the term evokes the quiet and seclusion [3] we can feel in the wilderness. With so many of us living in crowded cities [4] or suburbs these days, the feeling of Waldeinsamkeit can almost be a nostalgic experience.
When was the last time you were alone in the forest – secluded with nothing but the sound of the wind through the trees and bird calls from various corners of the wood? It’s a rarer instance these days, and I think that fact suggests there’s something endangered about this aspect of the human spirit [5]. The statement might sound draconian, but perhaps Waldeinsamkeit as a concept underscores a certain core experience to primal humanity, an experience that fewer of us have these days and most of us have less often. Who’s up for changing this?

Shinrin-yoku

While we’re on the subject of forests, here’s a tangible reason to get lost in the woods this weekend. Translated as “forest bathing,” shinrin-yoku is a growing trend and research-backed medical practice in Japan. The Japanese government has even partnered with the medical community to offer free check-ups in park areas and to designate official “forest therapy” sites.
Research on the effects of shinrin-yoku has demonstrated the power of a 3-day trip [6] to the forest to decrease blood pressure, pulse rate, and cortisol levels. But the real kicker is the impact on the body’s NK (natural killer) cells, lymphocytes that fight off infection and cancer growth as well as anti-cancer protein expression. The benefits, studies show, can last up to a month!
As the Primal logic suggests, activities that mirror the best of our evolutionary upbringing [7] will prompt the best hormonal and cellular responses, which then support the best mental and physical outcomes. When you have the chance to get to the wilderness [8], for the love of Grok [9] go! If you don’t have the chance, create the opportunity for yourself as soon as you can.

Friluftsliv

Try saying that five times as fast as you can…. Translated literally as “free air life,” it encompasses the emotional and spiritual well-being [10] to be had by being/living outside. However we choose to spend our time outside (e.g nature photography, hiking, trail running [11], Tai Chi in the park, picnicking, bike riding, Ultimate Frisbee or even napping), there’s something to the outdoor experience that’s unique and works on our mental mood.
As I’ve mentioned here before, time outdoors [12] works on our emotional, hormonal and overall physiological responses as well. Exercising outdoors, for one, has been shown to offer better stress relief than working out indoors.

Koyaanisqatsi

A Native American term from the Hopi culture, koyaanisqatsi means “crazy life” or even life out of balance. The larger sense behind the word suggests a way of life that is falling apart, a state of affairs that calls for another way of being.
We might be tempted to see the concept in our personal lives, and I can certainly see the applicability there. When we find ourselves overrun with insane commutes and overwhelming commitments, we eventually hit a point of critical mass. When we live in tune with our physical bodies, we realize we’re being called to find a new way of life, a better life balance [13].
Truer to the original intent, koyaanisqatsi refers to larger cultural conditions that can make life unsustainable – at both a sociological and ecological level. It’s not hard to see the applicability of this term to much of modern times. For all the benefits, much of modern life confounds our primal psychologies [14], not to mention the natural order of ecological balance. I think Primal can have something to do with that new way of living [15] in response….

Uitwaaien

After getting into the walking series [16] a couple of months ago, I was taken in by this Dutch term, which means to take a break to walk outside and clear one’s head [17].
Clearly, this concept hits on the need for outdoor time, but it also suggests something essential to the primal picture. Modern life drains us with such emphasis on directed attention. The result? We get emotionally irritable and mentally fatigued. The opposite of this is involuntary attention, the kind of unfocused but attentive presence [18] that would characterize Grok’s scanning of the horizon. Yet, this kind of attention plays such a small role in our day. We, being creatures of free will, have a choice.
Instead of hopping online at night or doing a crossword, we can give ourselves time to not think (an earth-shattering concept, no?). How about watching the dog play like a fool in the yard or going for a walk where we don’t have to watch for traffic? Daydreaming [19], anyone? Even mindless chores or creative hobbies that get us into a flow can offer enough cognitive variety to ease our weary modern brains.

Arbejdsglæde

This Danish word translates as “work happiness” or the satisfaction we feel with fulfilling work [20]. How many of us have felt this? When was the last time we did? Although we may situate our vocational vision outside of the work that pays the bills, do we experience this kind of joy [21] in our professional, volunteer or hobby endeavors?
In a culture that can perseverate on money, prestige [22], and comparison, Arbejdsglæde is one more reminder that vocational fulfillment is a means of genuine happiness – and inclusive well-being.
Thanks for reading, everyone. Which of the above grab your interest, and how do they speak to you? Do you have health concepts from around the globe to add to the list? Enjoy the end of your week.

6 Foreign Health Concepts from Around the Globe

Maybe it was running across the word Kummerspeck (literally translated from German as “grief bacon,” meaning weight put on through emotional eating). A strange term if there ever was one… The fact is, I’ve always been fascinated by how languages can reflect particular feelings or phenomena most of us would never think to put a word to. When it comes to the language of health [1] and well-being, I think certain terms have the unique power to literally shift our perception. They make us think differently about the choices in front of us [2] and the ways we interact with the the world. What health concepts can we learn from other cultures? How might they change our understanding of the choices we make every day – or how we view our options for living in general? Perhaps you have your own foreign terms that come to mind. I think these six concepts offer some intriguing food for thought.

Waldeinsamkeit

This German word (a mouthful, right?) means woodland solitude. As a combination of Wald (forest) and Einsamkeit (solitude or loneliness), the term evokes the quiet and seclusion [3] we can feel in the wilderness. With so many of us living in crowded cities [4] or suburbs these days, the feeling of Waldeinsamkeit can almost be a nostalgic experience.
When was the last time you were alone in the forest – secluded with nothing but the sound of the wind through the trees and bird calls from various corners of the wood? It’s a rarer instance these days, and I think that fact suggests there’s something endangered about this aspect of the human spirit [5]. The statement might sound draconian, but perhaps Waldeinsamkeit as a concept underscores a certain core experience to primal humanity, an experience that fewer of us have these days and most of us have less often. Who’s up for changing this?

Shinrin-yoku

While we’re on the subject of forests, here’s a tangible reason to get lost in the woods this weekend. Translated as “forest bathing,” shinrin-yoku is a growing trend and research-backed medical practice in Japan. The Japanese government has even partnered with the medical community to offer free check-ups in park areas and to designate official “forest therapy” sites.
Research on the effects of shinrin-yoku has demonstrated the power of a 3-day trip [6] to the forest to decrease blood pressure, pulse rate, and cortisol levels. But the real kicker is the impact on the body’s NK (natural killer) cells, lymphocytes that fight off infection and cancer growth as well as anti-cancer protein expression. The benefits, studies show, can last up to a month!
As the Primal logic suggests, activities that mirror the best of our evolutionary upbringing [7] will prompt the best hormonal and cellular responses, which then support the best mental and physical outcomes. When you have the chance to get to the wilderness [8], for the love of Grok [9] go! If you don’t have the chance, create the opportunity for yourself as soon as you can.

Friluftsliv

Try saying that five times as fast as you can…. Translated literally as “free air life,” it encompasses the emotional and spiritual well-being [10] to be had by being/living outside. However we choose to spend our time outside (e.g nature photography, hiking, trail running [11], Tai Chi in the park, picnicking, bike riding, Ultimate Frisbee or even napping), there’s something to the outdoor experience that’s unique and works on our mental mood.
As I’ve mentioned here before, time outdoors [12] works on our emotional, hormonal and overall physiological responses as well. Exercising outdoors, for one, has been shown to offer better stress relief than working out indoors.

Koyaanisqatsi

A Native American term from the Hopi culture, koyaanisqatsi means “crazy life” or even life out of balance. The larger sense behind the word suggests a way of life that is falling apart, a state of affairs that calls for another way of being.
We might be tempted to see the concept in our personal lives, and I can certainly see the applicability there. When we find ourselves overrun with insane commutes and overwhelming commitments, we eventually hit a point of critical mass. When we live in tune with our physical bodies, we realize we’re being called to find a new way of life, a better life balance [13].
Truer to the original intent, koyaanisqatsi refers to larger cultural conditions that can make life unsustainable – at both a sociological and ecological level. It’s not hard to see the applicability of this term to much of modern times. For all the benefits, much of modern life confounds our primal psychologies [14], not to mention the natural order of ecological balance. I think Primal can have something to do with that new way of living [15] in response….

Uitwaaien

After getting into the walking series [16] a couple of months ago, I was taken in by this Dutch term, which means to take a break to walk outside and clear one’s head [17].
Clearly, this concept hits on the need for outdoor time, but it also suggests something essential to the primal picture. Modern life drains us with such emphasis on directed attention. The result? We get emotionally irritable and mentally fatigued. The opposite of this is involuntary attention, the kind of unfocused but attentive presence [18] that would characterize Grok’s scanning of the horizon. Yet, this kind of attention plays such a small role in our day. We, being creatures of free will, have a choice.
Instead of hopping online at night or doing a crossword, we can give ourselves time to not think (an earth-shattering concept, no?). How about watching the dog play like a fool in the yard or going for a walk where we don’t have to watch for traffic? Daydreaming [19], anyone? Even mindless chores or creative hobbies that get us into a flow can offer enough cognitive variety to ease our weary modern brains.

Arbejdsglæde

This Danish word translates as “work happiness” or the satisfaction we feel with fulfilling work [20]. How many of us have felt this? When was the last time we did? Although we may situate our vocational vision outside of the work that pays the bills, do we experience this kind of joy [21] in our professional, volunteer or hobby endeavors?
In a culture that can perseverate on money, prestige [22], and comparison, Arbejdsglæde is one more reminder that vocational fulfillment is a means of genuine happiness – and inclusive well-being.
Thanks for reading, everyone. Which of the above grab your interest, and how do they speak to you? Do you have health concepts from around the globe to add to the list? Enjoy the end of your week.
Article printed from Mark's Daily Apple: http://www.marksdailyapple.com
URL to article: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/6-foreign-health-concepts-from-around-the-globe/